The Touch – Low Volume Drumming

This is Episode 1 of my lesson series on “Low Volume Drumming.” Here I’m going over the basic touch I use for low volume drumming. Learn how to reorient your thinking to relax your technique and be able to play softer than you ever thought possible. Leave a comment and let me know if this was helpful! Check out Episode 2 if you enjoyed this!

Kris Redus

I'm a Drummer, Worship Leader, Songwriter, and Multi-instrumentalist. I have a Masters in Jazz Studies from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary and I am currently the Minister of Music at Second Baptist Church in Corpus Christi, TX.

About Kris Redus 6 Articles
I'm a Drummer, Worship Leader, Songwriter, and Multi-instrumentalist. I have a Masters in Jazz Studies from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary and I am currently the Minister of Music at Second Baptist Church in Corpus Christi, TX.

2 Comments

  1. Very nice video, Joe Morello would always encourage practice at all dynamic levels and with low levels always emphasized using fingers. Low volume with intensity grooves nicely, too bad many musicians don’t explore this concept.
    I am currently working on Windows by Chick Corea, and ran across a transcription of Burtons solo that you did. I would love to have a PDF copy of that please. My email is kennethmettam@icloud.com. Thanks so much Kris, Great Work here!

  2. Excellent, Kris. And nicely articulated. I have for many years played from my wrists, and at one point made the switch from matched to traditional/orthodox grip. This was inspired by my early influences including Mitch Mitchell and Jon Hiseman, whose rolling style and propelling feel I love. By switching my left hand to attain a more circular motion on the snare, my right hand also changed somewhat. Overall I had greater control. And greater physical control enabled greater dynamic control.
    I once read a Neil Peart feature around the time he was studying – to change his grip etc. – with Freddy Gruber. He noted that whilst using matched grip, when his snare stick came down it was like he was swinging at the floor but the drum got in the way. There was the shock of the hit, but the inertia was still downward. So, with a combination of rebound and a reversal of movement he would physically ‘pull’ the stick back up to its starting position. With traditional grip the stick does not sink into the drum. Nor does it require a ‘recovery’ move. The motion, being circular, automatically returned the stick to that starting point, effecting only a glancing blow in the process. Your mention of ‘wrist’ and ‘energy’ reminded me that one’s efforts to reduce volume could benefit from an assessment of playing techinique versus how hard one plays using their current technique. I recently tried Adoro’s Silent Sticks as an alternative to attempting to adjust my volume. With those I play as normal but the volume is cut in half. That choice has much to do with factors including my style and what I want to hear and feel when I play. But I do appreciate what you demonstrate, and that for drummers playing a less aggressive style it is certainly a consideration.
    Once again, a tremendous presentation.

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